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How to Find the Right Vegan Prenatal Vitamin for You!

vitaMedMD

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The Search Begins

Whether you are vegan for reasons including your health, your principles, the environment, or all the above, it has become an important part of who you are. If you did not grow up vegan, you may have found it challenging at first to remove meat, poultry, fish, dairy, gelatin, and eggs from your diet – but in the end, it was worth it and you feel great! 

Now that you are planning to have a baby, or are already pregnant, it may be challenging to find a quality vegan prenatal vitamin that will provide the nutrients you and your baby need – but where do you begin? 

Well, you have probably done your research, studying ingredients and reading online reviews of vegan prenatal vitamins. You have probably talked to vegan friends and acquaintances, contacted vegan societies, and consulted with your healthcare provider on which vegan prenatal vitamins are best. Everyone seems to have a different opinion, depending what is most important to them – or no opinion at all.


It is About What’s Important to You

The question is – what is important to you when choosing a quality, vegan prenatal vitamin for you and your baby? Following are a few things to think about in your search.


Plant-based DHA

Does your prenatal vitamin contain docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)? DHA is an omega-3 essential fatty acid that supports your baby’s healthy fetal neurodevelopment1, hand/eye coordination2, and attention span and cognitive health3.

Make sure the DHA is plant-based and in a gelatin-free softgel.


Vitamin D2

Vitamin D is known as “the sunshine vitamin” because it is created naturally by the body when skin is exposed to the sun’s UV rays. An estimated 5-29% of pregnant women in the U.S. may have inadequate levels of vitamin D, with higher prevalence among African American women.4

Vitamin D supports healthy birth weight, postnatal bone growth and strength, and immune function5, may help minimize the risk of preeclampsia5, and helps support positive pregnancy rates in women undergoing IVF6.

 Vitamin D2 is recommended for vegans as it is derived from plant sources, while vitamin D3 is derived from animal by-products.


More of What You Want

Make sure that the vegan prenatal vitamin you choose:

  • Is certified vegan

  • Contains sufficient amounts of the Daily Value (% DV) of key nutrients, including DHA, folic acid, and iron.

  • Comes in convenient once daily dosing

  • Is available at a cost that fits into your budget


None of What You Don’t

Make sure that the vegan prenatal vitamin you choose:

  • Is gelatin, gluten, and lactose-free

  • Is fish-free

  • Has no added animal by-products

  • Contains no artificial dyes or sweeteners


You Don’t Have to Compromise!

Honest! We know it can be tough to find the right prenatal vitamin for you and your baby, that’s why we developed vitaTrue™, a quality, prescription prenatal vitamin that makes it easy to stay true to your vegan lifestyle. With vitaTrue, you get the nutrition you and your baby need – without compromise.


The information included in this article and on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. You should always consult your healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for your own situation.

 

References

  1. Greenberg J, Bell S, and Van Ausdal, Omega-3 Fatty Acid Supplementation During Pregnancy. Rev Obstet Gyencol. 2008 Fall; 1(4): 162-169. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2621042/.

  2. Dunstan JA, Mitoulas LR, Dixon G, et al. The effects of fish oil supplementation in pregnancy on breast milk fatty acid composition over the course of lactation: a randomized controlled trial. Pediatr Res. 2007 Dec;62(6):689-94.

  3. Colombo J, Kannass K, Shaddy D, et al. Maternal DHA and the Development of Attention in Infancy and Toddlerhood. Child Development. Volume 75, Issue 4, pages 1254–1267, July 2004.

  4. Brannon PM, Picciano MF. Vitamin D in pregnancy and lactation in humans. Annu Rev Nutr, 2011 Aug 21;31:89-115. doi: 10.1146/annurev.nutr.012809.104807.

  5. Mulligan M, Felton SK, Riek AE, et al. Implications of Vitamin D Deficiency in Pregnancy and Lactation. Am J Obstet, May 2010:202(5): 429.e1-429.e9.

  6. Paffoni A, Ferrari S, Vigano P, et al. Vitamin D Deficiency and Infertility: Insights From in vitro Fertilization Cycles. The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, 2014; jc.2014-1802 DOI: 10.1210/jc.2014-1802.

How to Find the Right Vegan Prenatal Vitamin for You!

12/22/2015 - Contributed by: vitaMedMD

undefined


The Search Begins

Whether you are vegan for reasons including your health, your principles, the environment, or all the above, it has become an important part of who you are. If you did not grow up vegan, you may have found it challenging at first to remove meat, poultry, fish, dairy, gelatin, and eggs from your diet – but in the end, it was worth it and you feel great! 

Now that you are planning to have a baby, or are already pregnant, it may be challenging to find a quality vegan prenatal vitamin that will provide the nutrients you and your baby need – but where do you begin? 

Well, you have probably done your research, studying ingredients and reading online reviews of vegan prenatal vitamins. You have probably talked to vegan friends and acquaintances, contacted vegan societies, and consulted with your healthcare provider on which vegan prenatal vitamins are best. Everyone seems to have a different opinion, depending what is most important to them – or no opinion at all.


It is About What’s Important to You

The question is – what is important to you when choosing a quality, vegan prenatal vitamin for you and your baby? Following are a few things to think about in your search.


Plant-based DHA

Does your prenatal vitamin contain docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)? DHA is an omega-3 essential fatty acid that supports your baby’s healthy fetal neurodevelopment1, hand/eye coordination2, and attention span and cognitive health3.

Make sure the DHA is plant-based and in a gelatin-free softgel.


Vitamin D2

Vitamin D is known as “the sunshine vitamin” because it is created naturally by the body when skin is exposed to the sun’s UV rays. An estimated 5-29% of pregnant women in the U.S. may have inadequate levels of vitamin D, with higher prevalence among African American women.4

Vitamin D supports healthy birth weight, postnatal bone growth and strength, and immune function5, may help minimize the risk of preeclampsia5, and helps support positive pregnancy rates in women undergoing IVF6.

 Vitamin D2 is recommended for vegans as it is derived from plant sources, while vitamin D3 is derived from animal by-products.


More of What You Want

Make sure that the vegan prenatal vitamin you choose:

  • Is certified vegan

  • Contains sufficient amounts of the Daily Value (% DV) of key nutrients, including DHA, folic acid, and iron.

  • Comes in convenient once daily dosing

  • Is available at a cost that fits into your budget


None of What You Don’t

Make sure that the vegan prenatal vitamin you choose:

  • Is gelatin, gluten, and lactose-free

  • Is fish-free

  • Has no added animal by-products

  • Contains no artificial dyes or sweeteners


You Don’t Have to Compromise!

Honest! We know it can be tough to find the right prenatal vitamin for you and your baby, that’s why we developed vitaTrue™, a quality, prescription prenatal vitamin that makes it easy to stay true to your vegan lifestyle. With vitaTrue, you get the nutrition you and your baby need – without compromise.


The information included in this article and on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. You should always consult your healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for your own situation.

 

References

  1. Greenberg J, Bell S, and Van Ausdal, Omega-3 Fatty Acid Supplementation During Pregnancy. Rev Obstet Gyencol. 2008 Fall; 1(4): 162-169. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2621042/.

  2. Dunstan JA, Mitoulas LR, Dixon G, et al. The effects of fish oil supplementation in pregnancy on breast milk fatty acid composition over the course of lactation: a randomized controlled trial. Pediatr Res. 2007 Dec;62(6):689-94.

  3. Colombo J, Kannass K, Shaddy D, et al. Maternal DHA and the Development of Attention in Infancy and Toddlerhood. Child Development. Volume 75, Issue 4, pages 1254–1267, July 2004.

  4. Brannon PM, Picciano MF. Vitamin D in pregnancy and lactation in humans. Annu Rev Nutr, 2011 Aug 21;31:89-115. doi: 10.1146/annurev.nutr.012809.104807.

  5. Mulligan M, Felton SK, Riek AE, et al. Implications of Vitamin D Deficiency in Pregnancy and Lactation. Am J Obstet, May 2010:202(5): 429.e1-429.e9.

  6. Paffoni A, Ferrari S, Vigano P, et al. Vitamin D Deficiency and Infertility: Insights From in vitro Fertilization Cycles. The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, 2014; jc.2014-1802 DOI: 10.1210/jc.2014-1802.