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Staying Fit During Pregnancy

vitaMedMD

WORKING OUT PREGNANCY IMAGE

Staying fit is just as important during pregnancy as it is before pregnancy. According to the Mayo Clinic, exercising during pregnancy may provide the following benefits:

  • Alleviates aches and discomforts, including back pain
  • Supports healthy mood and boost energy levels
  • Encourages sound sleep
  • Keeps excess weight gain in check
  • Increases stamina and enhances muscle strength1 

 

The National Institutes of Health also includes these important health benefits, noting that “regular, moderate physical activity during pregnancy” may help:

  • Reduce the risk of gestational diabetes
  • Promote an easier, shorter labor
  • Contribute to a faster recovery time after delivery
  • Help promote post-natal target (healthy) weight2

 

The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) suggests that you first see your healthcare provider before starting any exercise program, particularly during your pregnancy , and “in the absence of either medical or obstetric complications”, you can adopt the recommendation provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the American College of Sports Medicine for non-pregnant individuals: engage in “an accumulation of 30 minutes or more of moderate exercise a day most, if not all, days of the week”.3

 

ACOG goes on to suggest that walking, swimming, cycling, aerobics are safe to do while pregnant, and if you were a runner before pregnancy, you can continue to do so, with some adjustment.4  

 

The take away from all of this is whether you are not pregnant or pregnant, exercise does a body good – just check with your healthcare provider first!

 

The information included in this article and on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. You should always consult your healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for your own situation. 

 

Staying Fit During Pregnancy

07/15/2015 - Contributed by: vitaMedMD

WORKING OUT PREGNANCY IMAGE

Staying fit is just as important during pregnancy as it is before pregnancy. According to the Mayo Clinic, exercising during pregnancy may provide the following benefits:

  • Alleviates aches and discomforts, including back pain
  • Supports healthy mood and boost energy levels
  • Encourages sound sleep
  • Keeps excess weight gain in check
  • Increases stamina and enhances muscle strength1 

 

The National Institutes of Health also includes these important health benefits, noting that “regular, moderate physical activity during pregnancy” may help:

  • Reduce the risk of gestational diabetes
  • Promote an easier, shorter labor
  • Contribute to a faster recovery time after delivery
  • Help promote post-natal target (healthy) weight2

 

The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) suggests that you first see your healthcare provider before starting any exercise program, particularly during your pregnancy , and “in the absence of either medical or obstetric complications”, you can adopt the recommendation provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the American College of Sports Medicine for non-pregnant individuals: engage in “an accumulation of 30 minutes or more of moderate exercise a day most, if not all, days of the week”.3

 

ACOG goes on to suggest that walking, swimming, cycling, aerobics are safe to do while pregnant, and if you were a runner before pregnancy, you can continue to do so, with some adjustment.4  

 

The take away from all of this is whether you are not pregnant or pregnant, exercise does a body good – just check with your healthcare provider first!

 

The information included in this article and on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. You should always consult your healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for your own situation.