Managing Morning Sickness

Understanding the causes and finding relief!

vitamedMD

Managing Morning Sickness

Your emotions during pregnancy can certainly run the gamut. But those butterflies in your stomach may be more than just excitement or nervousness. They may be one of the most common side-effects of pregnancy: morning sickness.

About 75% of all pregnant women experience morning sickness during the first 12 weeks of pregnancy, beginning as early as the fourth week. The terminology, though, is a bit misleading. For many women, the associated nausea and headaches – as well as vomiting for 30% of women – don’t just occur in the morning. They can occur anytime during the day – and for some, can last beyond the first trimester.1

The intensity of morning sickness varies with each individual, but it’s important always to let your healthcare provider know about your symptoms, particularly if they are severe or continue past the first 12 weeks. Hyperemesis gravidarum – an extreme case of morning sickness that includes persistent nausea and vomiting during pregnancy – can lead to dehydration and weight loss that can affect you and your developing baby.

Causes

While there is no conclusive “cause” for morning sickness, there are some possible triggers that alone – or in combination – can make life challenging, albeit temporarily.

During pregnancy, especially early on, the body experiences rapidly rising blood levels of the human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) hormone, which is released by the placenta.2 Pregnancy also significantly increases levels of another hormone, estrogen.3 Nausea, vomiting, and/or headaches may be your body’s response to dramatic changes in these hormone levels.

Some pregnant women develop heightened sensitivities to smells – such as odors from perfumes, foods, cleaning products, etc. – that can prompt a gag reflex and cause nausea or vomiting. Stomach sensitivities also can be amplified, causing similar responses.

Statistics

Expectant mothers each react differently to pregnancy. Some statistical studies,2 though, indicate you may be more prone to morning sickness if you:

  • Have history of migraines or have had nausea and vomiting in a prior pregnancy
  • Have a medical history of negative side effects of nausea and vomiting from birth control pills (a response to higher estrogen levels)
  • Your mother or sisters had morning sickness (genetic predisposition)
  • Are pregnant with a girl (and 50% more likely to experience severe nausea and vomiting)
  • Are pregnant with multiples

Remedies

Just as there are no guarantees as to how your body will react to your pregnancy, there are no real cures for morning sickness. Here are a few natural ways1 to help manage your symptoms:

  • Graze (eat smaller meals often) to keep your metabolism balanced and to reduce stomach acid build-up
  • Stay hydrated and drink lots of non-caffeinated fluids throughout the day
  • Drink fluids a half-hour before or after you eat a meal, but not during
  • Eat a few soda crackers BEFORE you get out of bed in the morning
  • Sniff lemons or ginger to reduce nausea
  • Calm your stomach with lemonade, ginger ale, watermelon, or even salty potato chips
  • Get plenty of rest

 

The information included in this article and on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. You should always consult your healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for your own situation.

 

References:

  1. Morning Sickness Statistics. Pregnancy Statistics.org.
    http://www.pregnancystatistics.org/content/morning-sickness-statistics.html 
  2. Pregnancy Complications. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 
    http://www.cdc.gov/reproductivehealth/MaternalInfantHealth/PregComplications.htm
  3. Morning Sickness. Pregnancy Statistics.org. 
    http://www.pregnancystatistics.org/content/morning-sickness.html

 

© 2016 TherapeuticsMD, Inc. vitaMedMD® is a registered trademark of TherapeuticsMD, Inc.  VNEW-0007.03 03/16

Managing Morning Sickness

Understanding the causes and finding relief!

02/24/2016 - Contributed by: vitamedMD

Managing Morning Sickness

Your emotions during pregnancy can certainly run the gamut. But those butterflies in your stomach may be more than just excitement or nervousness. They may be one of the most common side-effects of pregnancy: morning sickness.

About 75% of all pregnant women experience morning sickness during the first 12 weeks of pregnancy, beginning as early as the fourth week. The terminology, though, is a bit misleading. For many women, the associated nausea and headaches – as well as vomiting for 30% of women – don’t just occur in the morning. They can occur anytime during the day – and for some, can last beyond the first trimester.1

The intensity of morning sickness varies with each individual, but it’s important always to let your healthcare provider know about your symptoms, particularly if they are severe or continue past the first 12 weeks. Hyperemesis gravidarum – an extreme case of morning sickness that includes persistent nausea and vomiting during pregnancy – can lead to dehydration and weight loss that can affect you and your developing baby.

Causes

While there is no conclusive “cause” for morning sickness, there are some possible triggers that alone – or in combination – can make life challenging, albeit temporarily.

During pregnancy, especially early on, the body experiences rapidly rising blood levels of the human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) hormone, which is released by the placenta.2 Pregnancy also significantly increases levels of another hormone, estrogen.3 Nausea, vomiting, and/or headaches may be your body’s response to dramatic changes in these hormone levels.

Some pregnant women develop heightened sensitivities to smells – such as odors from perfumes, foods, cleaning products, etc. – that can prompt a gag reflex and cause nausea or vomiting. Stomach sensitivities also can be amplified, causing similar responses.

Statistics

Expectant mothers each react differently to pregnancy. Some statistical studies,2 though, indicate you may be more prone to morning sickness if you:

  • Have history of migraines or have had nausea and vomiting in a prior pregnancy
  • Have a medical history of negative side effects of nausea and vomiting from birth control pills (a response to higher estrogen levels)
  • Your mother or sisters had morning sickness (genetic predisposition)
  • Are pregnant with a girl (and 50% more likely to experience severe nausea and vomiting)
  • Are pregnant with multiples

Remedies

Just as there are no guarantees as to how your body will react to your pregnancy, there are no real cures for morning sickness. Here are a few natural ways1 to help manage your symptoms:

  • Graze (eat smaller meals often) to keep your metabolism balanced and to reduce stomach acid build-up
  • Stay hydrated and drink lots of non-caffeinated fluids throughout the day
  • Drink fluids a half-hour before or after you eat a meal, but not during
  • Eat a few soda crackers BEFORE you get out of bed in the morning
  • Sniff lemons or ginger to reduce nausea
  • Calm your stomach with lemonade, ginger ale, watermelon, or even salty potato chips
  • Get plenty of rest

 

The information included in this article and on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. You should always consult your healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for your own situation.

 

References:

  1. Morning Sickness Statistics. Pregnancy Statistics.org.
    http://www.pregnancystatistics.org/content/morning-sickness-statistics.html 
  2. Pregnancy Complications. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 
    http://www.cdc.gov/reproductivehealth/MaternalInfantHealth/PregComplications.htm
  3. Morning Sickness. Pregnancy Statistics.org. 
    http://www.pregnancystatistics.org/content/morning-sickness.html

 

© 2016 TherapeuticsMD, Inc. vitaMedMD® is a registered trademark of TherapeuticsMD, Inc.  VNEW-0007.03 03/16