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Frequently asked questions

Q
Why is it important to take a prenatal vitamin even though I am not thinking about getting pregnant right now?
A

The CDC recommends that all women of childbearing age consume a minimum of 0.4 mg (400 micrograms) of folic acid daily to help prevent two common, serious neural tube defects (NTDs), spina bifida and anencephaly, as half of U.S. pregnancies are unplanned, and also because these birth defects occur very early in pregnancy (3-4 weeks after conception) – before most women even know they are pregnant.1




Q
What is the difference between folic acid and folate?
A

Folic acid and folate are both forms of vitamin B9, a water soluble member of the B-complex family of vitamins. Folic acid and folate are seen as particularly important in supporting healthy pregnancy. Vital to the body’s growth and development, they help play an important role in healthy neural tube development.2*

Folic acid is the synthetic form of vitamin B9 and is often used to fortify food like breads and cereals – and is often featured in comprehensive prenatal multivitamins. Folate is the naturally-occurring form of vitamin B9 and is found in dark, leafy greens like spinach, kale, and romaine lettuce; cruciferous vegetables such as brussels sprouts, rapini, and cauliflower; and fruits including oranges, grapefruit, and strawberries. Of the two, folic acid is better metabolized, and therefore, better absorbed by the body than folate’s natural form.2




Q
How much folic acid should I take every day?
A

All women need 400 micrograms of folic acid every day. Women who can get pregnant should get 400 to 800 micrograms of folic acid from a vitamin or from food that has added folic acid.3

The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) recommends that women take a minimum of 400 mcg of folic acid daily, starting at least one month before getting pregnant, to help prevent neural tube defects (NTDs) (defects of the baby’s brain and spine).2

Healthcare providers may recommend a prenatal vitamin with more based on individual needs.3

Those women who have previously had an NTD-affected pregnancy should consume 4 milligrams (4000 micrograms) of folic acid daily beginning one month before they start trying to get pregnant and continuing through the first three months of pregnancy.2

vitaPearl and vitamedMD RediChew Rx provide 1.4 mg of folic acid as FOLMAX. FOLMAX is a proprietary immediate and modified release folic acid formulated to help maintain folate levels in a woman’s body throughout the day.

Maintaining levels of folic acid in the body daily may help lessen the risk of NTDs.*




Q
Why is it important to take an iron supplement during pregnancy?
A

Iron is essential to the formation of hemoglobin, a protein that supports oxygen transport during pregnancy.4 Iron also supports healthy cell function of the heart, muscles, and skeletal system.5*




Q
What is the difference between chelated iron and other types of iron?
A

Chelated iron is more readily absorbed and easier on the digestive tract than other forms of iron. Chelation is a process where an iron molecule is attached to amino acids, which helps boost iron’s bioavailability.6




Q
What is DHA and why is it important in a prenatal vitamin?
A

Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is an omega-3 essential fatty acid (EFA) that supports healthy fetal neural development7, cognitive health and attention span8, and hand/eye coordination.9*




Q
Why is vitamin A not included in vitaMedMD prenatal vitamins?
A

vitaMedMD does not include vitamin A in our prenatal vitamin formulations for the following reasons:

  • Vitamin A is found naturally in many foods, including meat, dairy, fish, and eggs, and is present in most fruits and vegetables as beta-carotene, and is added to fortified cereals.
  • The average American gets enough vitamin A in their diet.
  • Consuming excess amounts of vitamin A during early pregnancy may lead to serious birth defects.10



*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

 

References

  1. Folic Acid. Recommendations. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/folicacid/recommendations.html
  2. Folate. Linus Pauling Institute, Oregon StateUniversity. http://lpi.oregonstate.edu/infocenter/vitamins/fa/
  3. US Department of Health and Human Services. Office on Women’s Health. Available at: https://www.womenshealth.gov/a-z-topics/folic-acid. Accessed March 10, 2020.
  4. Iron. Micronutrient Information Center. http://lpi.oregonstate.edu/infocenter/minerals/iron/
  5. Iron. Dietary Supplement Fact Sheet. National Institutes of Health. https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/Iron-HealthProfessional/
  6. Ashmead HD. The Absorption and Metabolism 01 Iron Amino Acid Chelate. ALAN v.51 n.1 supl.1 Caracas Mar. 2001. http://www.scielo.org.ve/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0004-06222001000500004
  7. Greenberg J, Bell S, and Van Ausdal, Omega-3 Fatty Acid Supplementation During Pregnancy. Rev Obstet Gyencol. 2008 Fall; 1(4): 162-169. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2621042/
  8. Colombo J, Kannass K, Shaddy D, et al. Maternal DHA and the Development of Attention in Infancy and Toddlerhood. Child Development. Volume 75, Issue 4, pages 1254–1267, July 2004.
  9. Dunstan JA, Mitoulas LR, Dixon G, et al. The effects of fish oil supplementation in pregnancy on breast milk fatty acid composition over the course of lactation: a randomized controlled trial. Pediatr Res. 2007 Dec;62(6):689-94.
  10. Institute of Medicine, Food and Nutrition Board. Dietary reference intakes: vitamin A, vitamin K, arsenic, boron, chromium, copper, iodine, iron, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, silicon, vanadium, and zinc. Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press; 2001.

vitaTrue® FAQs

Q
Which kosher organization certifies vitaTrue Prenatal Vitamins?
A

vitaTrue earned kosher certification from KOF-K Kosher Supervision, one of the premier kosher certifying agencies in the world. The KOF-K trademark, recognized worldwide, is a designation that must be earned.




Q
Which vegan organization certifies vitaTrue Prenatal Vitamins?
A

vitaTrue earned vegan certification from the non-profit organization, Vegan Action, which is also known as Vegan Awareness Foundation, which encourages the spread of vegan food options through public outreach campaigns. The Vegan Action symbol is a registered trademark and is awarded only to products that do not contain animal products or by-products and that have not been tested on animals.




Q
What form of DHA is used in vitaTrue?
A

vitaTrue only uses Plant Pure Omega-3® DHA, derived from highly-purified algal oil. It is a pure, potent source of DHA obtained from algae. It is fish-free, with no fishy burp back.




Q
Is vitaTrue’s DHA softgel capsule vegan and kosher-friendly?
A

Yes. vitaTrue’s DHA is in a vegan softgel capsule and does not contain gelatin or any animal by-products.




Q
vitaTrue contains 1.4 mg of folic acid. What is considered an optimal amount?
A

All women need 400 micrograms of folic acid every day. Women who can get pregnant should get 400 to 800 micrograms of folic acid from a vitamin or from food that has added folic acid.4

The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) recommends that women take a minimum of 400 mcg of folic acid daily, starting at least one month before getting pregnant, to help prevent neural tube defects (NTDs) (defects of the baby’s brain and spine).1

Healthcare providers may recommend a prenatal vitamin with more based on individual needs.4

Those women who have previously had an NTD-affected pregnancy should consume 4 milligrams (4000 micrograms) of folic acid daily beginning one month before they start trying to get pregnant and continuing through the first three months of pregnancy.1

vitaPearl and vitamedMD RediChew Rx provide 1.4 mg of folic acid as FOLMAX. FOLMAX is a proprietary immediate and modified release folic acid formulated to help maintain folate levels in a woman’s body throughout the day.

Maintaining levels of folic acid in the body daily may help lessen the risk of NTDs.*




Q
vitaTrue’s label says that it contains 30 mg of iron amino acid chelate. How does this form of iron differ from other forms?
A

Chelated iron is more readily absorbed and easier on the digestive tract than other forms of iron. Chelation is a process where an iron molecule is attached to amino acids, which helps boost iron’s bioavailability.2




Q
Is vitaTrue’s vitamin D vegan and kosher-friendly?
A

Yes. vitaTrue only uses vitamin D2 (ergocalciferol), a form of vitamin D derived from plant sources. vitaTrue is vegan and kosher certified.




Q
Why is vitamin A not included in vitaTrue prenatal vitamins?
A

vitaMedMD does not include vitamin A in our prenatal vitamin formulations for the following reasons:

  • Vitamin A is found naturally in many foods, including meat, dairy, fish, and eggs, and is present in most fruits and vegetables as beta-carotene, and is added to fortified cereals.
  • The average American gets enough vitamin A in their diet.
  • Consuming excess amounts of vitamin A during early pregnancy may lead to serious birth defects.3



Q
vitaTrue is vegan and kosher certified and provides 16 key vitamins and minerals. What is it missing?
A

vitaTrue is missing what you may not want in your prenatal vitamin. vitaTrue is fish-free, gelatin-free, and gluten-free; in addition, vitaTrue has no animal by-products or sugar.




References

  1. Folic Acid. Recommendations. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. https://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/folicacid/recommendations.html
  2. Ashmead HD. The Absorption and Metabolism 01 Iron Amino Acid Chelate. ALAN v.51 n.1 supl.1 Caracas Mar. 2001. http://www.scielo.org.ve/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0004-06222001000500004
  3. Institute of Medicine, Food and Nutrition Board. Dietary reference intakes: vitamin A, vitamin K, arsenic, boron, chromium, copper, iodine, iron, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, silicon, vanadium, and zinc. Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press; 2001.
  4. US Department of Health and Human Services. Office on Women’s Health. Available at: https://www.womenshealth.gov/a-z-topics/folic-acid. Accessed March 10, 2020.

vitaPearl FAQs

Q
What form of DHA is used in vitaPearl?
A

vitaPearl features 200 mg of pur-DHA™, a highly purified, marine-based DHA. pur-DHA meets 50 strict purity parameters before being released. The range of tests includes testing for the presence of heavy metals, pesticides, and other environmental contaminants.




Q
vitaPearl contains 30 mg of iron as FePlus®. How does this form of iron differ from other forms?
A

FePlus is a proprietary, blended chelate-containing iron that is quickly absorbed by the body and gentle on the stomach. Chelation, the process of binding iron molecules to an amino acid, stabilizes iron so it is readily absorbed into the bloodstream while being gentle on the gastrointestinal (GI) tract.1* FePlus is food-friendly and has no metallic taste, so you can take your prenatal vitamin with or without meals.




Q
vitaPearl contains 1.4 mg of folic acid. What is considered an optimal amount?
A

All women need 400 micrograms of folic acid every day. Women who can get pregnant should get 400 to 800 micrograms of folic acid from a vitamin or from food that has added folic acid.7

The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) recommends that women take a minimum of 400 mcg of folic acid daily, starting at least one month before getting pregnant, to help prevent neural tube defects (NTDs) (defects of the baby’s brain and spine).2

Healthcare providers may recommend a prenatal vitamin with more based on individual needs.7
Those women who have previously had an NTD-affected pregnancy should consume 4 milligrams (4000 micrograms) of folic acid daily beginning one month before they start trying to get pregnant and continuing through the first three months of pregnancy.2
vitaPearl and vitamedMD RediChew Rx provide 1.4 mg of folic acid as FOLMAX. FOLMAX is a proprietary immediate and modified release folic acid formulated to help maintain folate levels in a woman’s body throughout the day.
Maintaining levels of folic acid in the body daily may help lessen the risk of NTDs.*




Q
Why is vitamin A not included in vitaPearl prenatal vitamins?
A

vitaMedMD does not include vitamin A in our prenatal vitamin formulations for the following reasons:

  • Vitamin A is found naturally in many foods, including meat, dairy, fish, and eggs, and is present in most fruits and vegetables as beta-carotene, and is added to fortified cereals.
  • The average American gets enough vitamin A in their diet.
  • Consuming excess amounts of vitamin A during early pregnancy may lead to serious birth defects.3



Q
FD&C Blue #1 is listed in the Other Ingredients section of vitaPearl’s label. Is it safe?
A

Yes, according to the FDA, FD&C Blue No. 1 is a water-soluble color additive approved by the FDA for use in foods, drugs and cosmetics.4,5




Q
Titanium Dioxide is listed in the Other Ingredients section of vitaPearl’s label. Is it safe?
A

Yes, according to the FDA. Titanium dioxide is an FDA approved food and drug color additive commonly added to tablets to make them white.




*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

 

References

  1. Ashmead HD. The Absorption and Metabolism 01 Iron Amino Acid Chelate. ALAN v.51 n.1 supl.1 Caracas Mar. 2001. http://www.scielo.org.ve/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0004-06222001000500004
  2. Folic Acid. Recommendations. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/folicacid/recommendations.html
  3. Institute of Medicine, Food and Nutrition Board. Dietary reference intakes: vitamin A, vitamin K, arsenic, boron, chromium, copper, iodine, iron, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, silicon, vanadium, and zinc. Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press; 2001.
  4. 21 CFR § 74.101, 74.1101, 74.2101, and 82.101 FD&C Blue No. 1. Drugs.com. http://www.drugs.com/inactive/fd-c-blue-no-1-244.html
  5. Summary of Color Additives for Use in the United States in Foods, Drugs, Cosmetics, and Medical Devices. http://www.fda.gov/forindustry/coloradditives/coloradditiveinventories/ucm106626.htm
  6. 21 CFR § 73.575 and 73.1575 Titanium dioxide is listed as an ingredient in my supplement. Is it safe? ConsumerLab.com.https://www.consumerlab.com/answers/Titanium+dioxide+is+listed+as+an+ingredient+in+my+supplement.+Is+it+safe%3F/titanium_dioxide/
  7. US Department of Health and Human Services. Office on Women’s Health. Available at: https://www.womenshealth.gov/a-z-topics/folic-acid. Accessed March 10, 2020.

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